Electricity

Switzerland and the EU would like to ensure certainty in the supply of electricity in the deregulated market environment.
Switzerland and the EU would like to ensure certainty in the supply of electricity in the deregulated market environment. © Matthew Henry

For decades, Switzerland's electricity market and infrastructure have been closely interwoven with those of its neighbouring countries. This integration into the European electricity market is in Switzerland's interest, as it helps to achieve national energy policy objectives and guarantees a reliable electricity supply in Switzerland.

Switzerland aims to ensure a reliable, clean and affordable electricity supply. Integration in the European electricity market is an important step towards achieving this.  

Over the past 25 years, Switzerland's European neighbours have merged their national electricity markets to become a single internal market for electricity, with market rules constantly evolving. From its central location, Switzerland also trades in electricity with the countries around it. While this trade is set to continue, it will become more complicated without an electricity agreement between Switzerland and the EU. Market rules are increasingly harmonised throughout the European Economic Area (EU member states plus Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein), but Switzerland has its own set of rules. An electricity agreement could provide a legal basis for ensuring Switzerland's participation in Europe's internal market for electricity.

Switzerland would thus consolidate its role as a European electricity hub, simplify the integration of renewable energy and open up new opportunities for its flexible hydropower resources.

Timeline

  • January 2020: Entry into force of the EU Clean Energy Package
  • July 2018: Last round of CH–EU negotiations
  • September 2010: Extension of negotiating mandate
  • September 2009: Entry into force of the EU Third Energy Package
  • November 2007: Start of negotiations